Saturday, March 24, 2012

Bowers Museum - Terra-Cotta Warriors

What if you had a chance to visit an artifact made in 221BC and traveled all the way from China? Would you make the extra effort to drive a few miles to see it? Why not? What if it was free, your kids could attend and the event was on a Sunday afternoon? A few Sunday's ago, we attended the "Free Museum Day" at the Bowers Museum presented by Target. Bowers' is hosting the famous "Terra-Cotta Warriors", which were discovered in China in 1974. It is estimated these statues were made around the year 221 BC for the after-life protection of Emperor Qin Shi Huangdi. 

The history of these amazing statues is very interesting and thought provoking. To learn about the history of the Terra-Cotta Army you can read their amazing story on National Geographic website at the link listed below.


Bowers Museum had a private room for this special exhibit with many artifacts that were from the same period. The pictures you see now do not begin to show all the detail of  the artifacts.  Vistor's were not allowed to use flash photography or get too close to the artifacts.  As always, I am sharing the photos of my fun and great field trips our family attends for your enrichment.  Please take a moment and look through these amazing pictures of the past, "Terra-Cotta Warriors". 


Standing in front of these Warriors, I realized that life was rough in 221 BC. The serious stares on the Terra-Cotta Warriors brought attention to a very conservative life they must have lived.  I continued to think of their commitment in the after-life. The exhibit seemed very serious and thought provoking. 

Why did a royal feel so compelled to make thousands of these Terra-Cotta Warriors? What can we learn from the past and how can this information make the future better? What did they know about our future that we have yet to discover? There are so many questions, I wish the Terra-Cotta Warriors could speak.


Standing in the exhibit with my kids, I knew that we as humans believe in something that can not be seen. More important is what was the past trying to tell us about our future? My kids are too little to understand, but they still thought the mystery of it all was worth exploring. They asked questions that I could not answer as they required more research. The maps and the audio in the room were helpful for many of the kids questions. For a brief moment, I became a teacher pointing to time-lines and seeking information to better help explain the exhibits to my kids. I felt as though one day was not enough to explore Bowers Museum and all it has to offer.

On Free Museum Sunday, Bowers Museum, had free crafts for the kids, African drum musicians and vendors in the courtyard of the museum. The kids had fun taking in the crafting and the music. They made masks, then walked around the museum pretend playing with their tribal masks. My kids had fun exploring the arts and culture that Bowers Museum had to offer.  It was a day my family and I won't soon forget. 


Free Sunday Museum at Bowers Museum hosted by Target.


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